pH and Brain Function [and the role of the respiratory muscles]

Dr Emile Kraepelin, towards the end of his career in 1926, hypothesized that patients with [untreated] manic depressive insanity [bipolar illness] were suffering from metabolic dysfunction. He suspected and acid base problem affecting locomotor activity, mood and brain function. Today, with modern tools, scientist are finding evidence of lowered pH in the brains of patients… Continue reading pH and Brain Function [and the role of the respiratory muscles]

Breathing, the skeletal muscles, internal CO2 production and the Mind

So we hope to have reinforced the importance of the respiratory muscles in t controlling internally generated carbon dioxide and how this relates to the proper function of the brain and of our ability to think and to remember. [Internal CO2 is continually produced during life , by our cells {along with water and energy… Continue reading Breathing, the skeletal muscles, internal CO2 production and the Mind

Carbon Dioxide is Produced by our very own Cells

The energy in food is converted into energy that can be used by the body's cells. During cellular respiration, glucose and oxygen are converted into carbon dioxide and water, and energy and the energy is transferred to ATP, an important fuel used by cells. Carbon dioxide helps the blood to flow throughout the brain. Internal… Continue reading Carbon Dioxide is Produced by our very own Cells

The Skeletal Muscles through the lifespan; and changes to thinking, breathing and moving.

Think about the growth and changes to our physical skeleton and to our skeletal muscles as we reach physical maturity by age 15, 20, 25 and 30. . Not only do we grow to our adult size, but our reproductive system becomes active as well. It is amazing, when you consider the magnitude of these… Continue reading The Skeletal Muscles through the lifespan; and changes to thinking, breathing and moving.

Cortical excitability and the partial pressure of [mostly endogenous] carbon dioxide

"Cortical excitability, here defined as the strength of the response of cortical neurons to a given stimulation, reflects neuron reactivity and response specificity and is therefore a fundamental aspect of human brain function." Ly, J., Gaggioni, G., Chellappa, S. et al. Circadian regulation of human cortical excitability. Nat Commun 7, 11828 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms11828 SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT "In this study, we show for the… Continue reading Cortical excitability and the partial pressure of [mostly endogenous] carbon dioxide

Life, Mind, Hormesis and Homeostatic Feedback in Illness

Life [definition]; the condition that distinguishes animals and plants from inorganic matter, including the capacity for growth, reproduction, functional activity, and continual change preceding death. https://www.lexico.com/definition/life ....accessed Jan.6, 20222. Hormesis [definition]; A low dose of a chemical agent may trigger from an organism the opposite response to a very high dose. Illustration of how a low dose… Continue reading Life, Mind, Hormesis and Homeostatic Feedback in Illness

Hormesis may explain Mind and Loss of Mind.

Hormesis A low dose of a chemical agent may trigger from an organism the opposite response to a very high dose. A low dose of a chemical agent may trigger from an organism the opposite response to a very high dose. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, accessed January 5, 2022. HormesisĀ is a characteristic of many biological processes, namely a… Continue reading Hormesis may explain Mind and Loss of Mind.

Why are Skeletal Motor Patterns affected in syndromes such as Bipolar Illness and Delirium?

Energy may be the reason why skeletal motor patterns are affected in syndromes such as bipolar illness and delirium. Both syndromes have clear psychomotor patterns; in delirium the motor subtypes are called hypo motor [quiet] subtype,, hyper motor [vocal] subtype and mixed subtypes. In psychiatry, these motor patterns are called psychomotor retardation and psychomotor excitement… Continue reading Why are Skeletal Motor Patterns affected in syndromes such as Bipolar Illness and Delirium?